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usnatarchivesexhibits:

President Bill Clinton’s Eulogy for the Bombing Victims in Oklahoma City, 04/23/1998

Item from Records of the White House Office of Records Management (Clinton Administration). (1993 - 2001)

Today is National Oklahoma City Bombing Commemoration Day. Here are President Bill Clinton’s words as he spoke to the families of the victims. 

Source: http://go.usa.gov/D8fj

Poetry quiz: can you match these first lines to their poem titles? | OxfordWords blog

todaysdocument:

The Vermont Bookwagon and New Hampshire State Library Bookmobile celebrate National Bookmobile Day and National Library Week with a friendly race.

From “The Day the Books Went Blank”, a 1961 educational film intended to show the importance of maintaining quality libraries, from The Library Extension Agencies of the six New England States.

New Hampshire, represent!

usnatarchives:

Happy National Libraries Week! Did you know that David S. Ferriero, who is the head of the National Archives, is actually a librarian? But before he became the tenth Archivist of the United States, “Dave Ferriero” was a boy who wrote to President Eisenhower and requested an autographed photograph. The letter was saved in the holdings of Eisenhower Presidential Library! The Archivist’s letter to President Eisenhower is currently on display in our exhibit "Making their Mark: Stories Through Signatures."  You can read more about the Archivist’s career on our website. Letter and autographed photograph from the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum
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usnatarchives:

Happy National Libraries Week! Did you know that David S. Ferriero, who is the head of the National Archives, is actually a librarian?

But before he became the tenth Archivist of the United States, “Dave Ferriero” was a boy who wrote to President Eisenhower and requested an autographed photograph. The letter was saved in the holdings of Eisenhower Presidential Library!

The Archivist’s letter to President Eisenhower is currently on display in our exhibit "Making their Mark: Stories Through Signatures."

You can read more about the Archivist’s career on our website.

Letter and autographed photograph from the Eisenhower Presidential Library and Museum

FYNF EXCLUSIVE: John Green & Sarah Urist Green on the red carpet at the MTV Movie Awards

effyeahnerdfighters:

In the latest “life is weird” news, John Green and wife, Art Assignment host Sarah Urist Green, coolly saunter down the red carpet. Until John falls flat on his face. See the link to enjoy!

Professor Jen’s Class: Questions for Writers

bethrevis:

jenniferlynnbarnes:

This week in my Cognitive Science of Fiction class (at the University of Oklahoma), we’re talking about the psychology of writing. Specifically, we’ve been talking a lot about whether writers are more likely to perceive writing as an act of creation or an act of discovery.

In the class, we do a lot of experimental design (yay, science!), and the first step of the scientific method is observation. Since I am a writer, this means my students have been probing the way that I think about these things, but I told them I would post their questions to tumblr to see if other writers (published or otherwise!) would like to chime in.

So if you have a few minutes and you’re a writer, I’d love it if you could answer one or more of the following questions:

1. Do you ever perceive your characters as having any free will? Do you feel like you consciously control everything your characters do, or do you sometimes feel like they control their own actions?

2. Do you perceive your characters as having more free will (or more of a “mind of their own”) if they are similar to you or dissimilar to you? Does the point of view you are writing in ever affect this?

3. Do reader/fan reactions ever change your understanding of who a character “really is” (or have you ever discovered something you did not realize was true about one of your characters based on feedback from early readers?)

4. If you’ve ever had a movie made from your book, do you think the movie altered your mental image/concept/understanding of the character in any way?

1. Nope—they don’t have free will. They’re made of ink. I control all. I try to establish believable motivations and backgrounds, so my characters do things that are logical for their characterization, so, inasmuch as that, they have “free will”—the background I created for them dictates what happens, not the idea of what I want for the plot. But they’re definitely fiction. 

2. No.

3. Not really. A reader’s interpretation of a character most often reflects the reader, not the author or the character. Sometimes I do include things on a subconscious level in my work, and readers have picked that up. 

4. I’ve not had this happen to my work, but I view movies of books as fan fic, so I doubt it would influence me any more than a fan fic would. Maybe it would more clearly show what a character looks like—I don’t really have a good visual of specifics. 

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